Love Your Tribe – Get 1 & Gift 1

We feel so loved, and we have YOU to thank!

A few months ago, the Tribe of Women team spent the day in one of our favorite retail shops in our hometown of Fayetteville, Arkansas – Handmade Market. Owners Shannon and Bryan Gott have been supporters of our mission and vision since the very first sparks of the movement started to fly, and we were thrilled to have our inaugural retail merchandise available in their shop throughout the month of February, which we have dubbed “Love Your Tribe” month.

Love Your Tribe event at Handmade Market | TribeofWomen.com

Our first batch of Love Your Tribe t-shirts arrived from our sponsor Wildheart Printing just in time  to be premiered that month, and we were tickled to hear that you love them as much as we do. Now, the shirts are for sale online on our website, under our Shop tab!

Thanks to our partnerships with Arcade Coffee Roasters and Savageann products we were able to promote our “Get 1 Gift 1” motto. Handmade also has some of their regular merchandise priced to inspire the desire to get one for yourself and gift one to your tribe.

Love Your Tribe event at Handmade Market | TribeofWomen.com

During our open house at Handmade, love busted out all over in the back room. We covered a couple of tables with paper and stickers and assorted supplies and encouraged anyone who wanted to get their craft on to make cards for their tribe. We love the conversations that happen when women come together – some who know each other, some who don’t – and get busy making.

Love Your Tribe Recap | TribeofWomen.com

So, thank you so MUCH to everyone who was part of this first foray into the retail world and bringing Tribe of Women swag to market. If you are a retailer or creator that would like to do retail partnership or events with us, please contact us at info@tribeofwomen.modthink.net.

Just want to stay in the know about new products, get coupon codes, and be entered to win gifts from us when you Join THE Tribe and our newsletter.

We love our tribe. And thank you for loving us RIGHT BACK!

Independent Women – History in the Making

History has a strange way of making the world seem simultaneously vast and small; old and new. Perspective always has a way of changing the way you see the world, and, like an optical illusion, you’re never able to grasp the full picture at the same time. Look too closely and you miss the big picture. Grasp the big picture and you miss the interesting details.

I was given a little bit of perspective not that long ago when I volunteered to help with Tribe Table @ Bentonville Film Festival and got to listen in on the stories of women in the film industry while they were interviewed by Tribe of Women founder, Amy Robinson. One guest talked about how women have only been “allowed” to have credit cards within the past 40 years. Another talked about her previous work experience as a sales associate in the late 1990’s and how she was only allowed (that word again) to work on a sale up to a certain dollar amount, at which time a man would have to come and finish the deal.

Shock… Then Awe

I was shocked. Not only because they didn’t think that women didn’t have financial rights, or that someone who had done all of the work to get a sale to where it was, could suddenly not seal the deal, but that this occurred the past few decades, and within my lifetime.

And thus, out of curiosity and a desire to understand and contextualize the progress of women in history, I was inspired to develop my own timeline, “A Brief History of Women’s Independence”. I wanted to remind myself of just how recent the rights I often take for granted were won. In particular, I wanted to give myself a little bit of perspective on women’s rights – how far we have progressed, how much we can accomplish in mere decades, and how far we still have to go.

I cannot stress enough that this is a brief and biased history (as is most history). In honor of the 4th of July, I decided to focus only on women’s independence in the U.S. beginning in the 1770’s. Even with this shortened time frame, I’ve missed a lot. For example, I didn’t include the still current #MeToo movement or that there’s a record number of women running for office – that history is still being written. One of the biggest things missing from this timeline is the social attitudes and prejudices. For example, I would be surprised to find in any of my history books the limits and discrimination of financial rights for women, or the year women they were finally allowed to finish the sales they started. Or maybe it hasn’t happened yet? At least for some.

So, while this exercise has helped put things in perspective for me, I realize it is only my perspective – a young woman in the United States of America perspective – and that there are other perspectives to add and stories to be told. Societal attitudes and prejudices have a much more mercurial nature than laws and history portray. When looking through textbooks it’s easy to find when a law, such as voting rights for women, was enacted. However, when society’s attitude changes to accept the underlying premise of that law, that “Women should be treated as equals to men,” – is not so easy to pinpoint. Maybe because we haven’t arrived at that point in herstory. At least not everyone. At least not yet.

Herstory

History is organized by numbers, but it’s perpetuated by stories. Only through storytelling do we learn about others, ourselves, and our world.

Artist: Shepherd Fairy’s “We the People” Series

Like I said, this timeline is biased. I leafed through history and picked out things that interested me, but the timeline is missing stories that I can’t tell, a depth that I can’t add. Within one of our pillars at Tribe of Women is “Tribe Stories” – the place where we connect. And that’s what we ask from you, our readers. Any stories you have, of how women’s rights or societal attitudes have changed (or have not changed), of yourself or of others, we urge you to share, to write, to tell. Your stories are part of the narrative of herstory lived and that is still being written.

Your Story

What historical events do you think should have been included? What stories or memories do you have of historical changes in laws or in attitudes? What are you celebrating this 4th of July? Please share in the comments below, post on the social media thread where you found this blog, or send it to us directly at info@tribeofwomen.modthink.net with “Independent Women” in the subject line.

Boss Lady: Loria Oliver’s Sanity Saving Invention

We are thrilled to share our interview with Loria Oliver, inventor of the Tot Tote! Loria was excited to share her journey and encourage women to be the boss ladies they aspire to be at the quarterly Boss Lady Mixer in February, hosted by i’Mindful Gives Back. Tribe of Women is proud to be a partner for this event and bring you the stories of these boss ladies.

Momspiration

Loria and her husband had their first son in 2011 and quickly added another bouncy baby boy to the family in 2012. With boys so close in age and active, life was beautiful but the car was chaotic. Animal crackers, juice boxes, books, and toys were everywhere in the back seat and Loria set out to find a solution.

Loria Oliver Family Time Two Boys Mom Ventor Harry TV Tot Tote Invention

Back seat car stress soon took a front seat when she discovered that a kid-friendly, fun and creative solution that was also useful did not exist on the market. She knew she was not the only parent experiencing frustration at the extra time it took to stay organized, so she put her empathy to work and began her entrepreneurial journey to solve a problem for herself, and moms and dads everywhere.

Loria’s Tot Tote invention now exists on the market to support families like hers who are seeking to spend less time cleaning up and more time being together. It’s versatility as a traditional tote bag or backpack surprises and delights anyone with a desire to keep the car tidy when it also opens up to become a back seat organizer! 

A Matter of Perspective

“My perspective as a woman is a huge part of how I think about developing a product, promoting it, creating partnerships and selling. Being a mother inspired me and reminded me that there are still opportunities to create, to take risks, and to continue to believe and encourage myself like I do daily for my children. I don’t put boundaries on what success looks like for them, so why should I do that to myself?”

And if your perspective on the world is calling you to do something about it?

“For other ladies looking to develop ideas, my advice is to not give up, to be flexible in making edits, connect with people who have different skill sets than you, be able to take critical feedback, and have fun with the process.”

Tribe it Forward

Creativity Colorful Designs Women Entrepreneurs Tot Tote Bag

The tribe of women who supports Loria is comprised of the women in her family who still catch her when she falls, her childhood friends who she has had for over 25 years and tell her the truth even when it’s been hard, and women who she has met in adulthood who have cheered her on when she didn’t know how to cheer for herself.  Loria says, “Recently, I’ve collaborated with two women on an exclusive line of Tot Totes for downtown Bentonville boutique Rollie Pollie. It was an awesome process and I look forward to doing it, again!”

Women are so powerful when we come together. Aren’t we? Go Team Tot Tote & Rollie Pollie!

Why do you believe in tribes of women?

“Having women who believe in you is a gift but it doesn’t come without work. Finding those women starts with you. Be a woman who supports, listens and encourages. Be a woman who is honest, transparent and gracious. Build your network of women by being the woman you want to attract.”

Boom! You are so boss, lady. Thank you for sharing your journey and story with us, Loria. We’re looking forward to all that is ahead for you.

Do you know a Boss Lady? Comment and share a little bit about her here!